EXHIBITS FOR THE MONTHS - APRIL 2015 | PAVILON SKLA PASK KLATOVY

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EXHIBITS FOR THE MONTHS - APRIL 2015
  • Pavilon skla Klatovy
  • Pavilon skla Klatovy
  • Výstava Lötz, Klatovy
  • Výstava Lötz, Klatovy
  • Pavilon skla Klatovy
  • Pavilon skla Klatovy
  • Sklo Lötz, Šumava
  • Sklo Lötz, Šumava
  • Sklo Lötz, Šumava
  • Sklo Lötz, Šumava
  • Sklo Lötz, Šumava
Sklo Lötz, Šumava6 Sklo Lötz, Šumava6 Pavilon skla Klatovy5 Pavilon skla Klatovy5 Pavilon skla Klatovy4 Pavilon skla Klatovy4 Sklo Lötz, Šumava3 Sklo Lötz, Šumava3 Výstava Lötz, Klatovy1 Výstava Lötz, Klatovy1 Výstava Lötz, Klatovy1

Exhibits for the months - April 2015

Exhibits for the Months – April

Inspired by Historical Shapes

The producers of Art Nouveau glass were often inspired by different periods from history thereby giving the glass a new esthetical dimension. The company Loetz was no exception. The historical inspiration can be demonstrated in its production using two examples from the time before the year 1900.

On the Left:

A vase for tulips

In this case the shape was inspired by tulip vases from the 17th and 18th centuries, which were produced in faience in the Dutch city of Delft. Loetz adjusted the basic form to a glass-like material and had this new sample registered in two sizes at the Business and Trade Chamber in Plzeň in June 1899. The smaller vase (in the picture) is 6” tall (about 15 cm) and has five openings for flowers, while the larger size is similar but bigger – 10” tall (about 25,5 cm) and seven openings for flowers. The production number of the larger vase was I-7891/10“ while the smaller vase’s production number was I-7891/6“ (in the year 1900 serial number II-94 too). The rims of these vases were hot shaped in a special metal mold. The smaller vase was produced in several different styles including Olympia, bronze glatt and Papillon (names of styles remain in the original form). The vase in the picture is in creta Papillon style, which was recorded in 1899 in the order of a London-based company Max Emanuel & Co. (production number Com. 346/718). There are also records of the smaller vase being in the creta Rusticana style with a small looped snake transforming into the handle. The bigger vases had a wider spectrum of styles used including the Phaenomen style. This type of vase was especially popular in 1899 to 1900.

On the right:

Vase – rosenwater sprinkler

For centuries there were many vessels in many shapes and made of many materials that were used for the spraying of rosenwater in Islamic countries. Many specific types of this kind of glass were developed and used during a specific period in one region. Glass vessels for rosenwater were produced mainly in Persia in the 18th and 19th centuries - the characteristic shapes included plump bodies, long necks with the rims shaped into leaves or flowers. The American glass producer Louis Comfort Tiffany was inspired by the shapes of these very vessels in the mid nineties of the 19th century; he started producing vases made of glass having a similar shape with an iridescent surface (Favrile glass). Both the shape and style received attention and customers starting ordering similar products from various companies including Loetz. One of the first of these customers was likely the London-based company Max Emanuel & Co. And for this reason, the glassworks in Klášterský Mlýn started producing a wide assortment of shaped vases of this kind in many styles from the year 1898 at the latest. The vase in the picture is in the creta glatt style but its production number has not been identified with conviction. It could likely be the style with a serial number of Com. 346/389 from 1898.
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